Many shades of beige

January 3, 2010 at 9:03 pm 1 comment

Amish Linen

I don’t know if it is the new bread recipe that I have stumbled upon (and modified, of course), or the dull, dreary, no snow so everything is brown-and-dead-looking days we’ve been experiencing… but I have picked the bathroom paint colour. You guessed it – beige. Despite its name, “Amish Linen”, it really is just a simple shade of beige. That is… if we are going to be boring about it. I’d like to describe this paint colour as a light brown with soft undertones of orange that bring out the warm caramel accents in the tiles. So really, it isn’t a boring beige that will adorn our bathroom walls, it will be like being enveloped in a warm oatmeal cookie with butterscotch chips. I think I have been spending way too much time in the kitchen over the Christmas break. About that, as I mentioned, I have found the most versatile bread recipe that it is really holding up to the changes I’ve made to it. The first time I made the recipe (which I have provided below), I used 4 cups of all-purpose flour and 2 cups of whole wheat pastry flour, and I used half a cup of flax meal and half a cup of whole sunflower seeds. Today, I made this bread with 3 cups of all-purpose flour and 3 and a half cups of whole wheat pastry flour. Instead of flax meal, I used hemp meal. Next time, I’m going to attempt using even less all-purpose flour… and as soon as I am sure my daughter can have nuts without any reactions, I think I might even try some walnut meal. And the sugar in the recipe – I plan to substitute some honey or agave nectar next time, or maybe just some fine organic cane sugar. If you try any of these, let me know how it works out.

It appears to be snowing out now. Maybe our beige world outside will soon be white. I wonder what it will inspire?

The most versatile bread I have ever baked - and it is good too.

Versatile Bread Recipe

  • 6 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour (see notes above)
  • 3/4 cup flax meal (or hemp meal, or sunflower seeds, or a combination)
  • 3 tablespoons of sugar
  • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon quick rising yeast
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Set aside 1/2 cup of the flour and mix the remaining flour, flax meal, sugar, salt and yeast in a large mixing bowl. In a small saucepan, heat the water, milk and oil until it is just hot to the touch. Be sure not to boil it or it will kill the yeast when you add it to the flour mixture. Stir the milk mixture into the flour mixture adding enough of the reserved flour so that the dough does not stick to the sides of the bowl. Knead the dough until smooth (I use my mixer with the dough hook for this). Cover the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes. Divide the dough in half and shape into two greased (I use cooking spray) loaf pans. Cover and let the dough rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size (about an hour). Bake in a preheated 400F degree oven for 30 minutes. You’ll know it is ready if you tap it and it sounds hollow. Remove from the pan and cool on a wire rack.

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Entry filed under: Projects, Recipes. Tags: , , .

Christmas morning Resolutions

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. MoreOptimism  |  January 12, 2010 at 9:12 am

    3 tablespoons of honey instead of the sugar works just fine and tastes even better. Add the honey to the milk-water-oil mixture.

    Reply

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